SUPER

Superior perceptual capacity in autism:

investigating universality, specificity and practical applications for learning

In our research, we aim to gain a deeper understanding of how autistic individuals perceive and process information in different situations. By doing this, we hope to provide better support for those who struggle with sensory sensitivities and develop the best possible learning conditions for all. Adjusting tasks, expectations, and environments to suit individual needs can help create optimal conditions for learning and development. Our research also aims to aid educators in minimising unnecessary distractions during interactions, promoting a world that nurtures the flourishing of every autistic person.

Our previous research in this area has found that autistic people can take in more information at any given moment, e.g., are better at detecting a target sound hidden among other sounds, compared to non-autistic people. This could be useful in some situations, but problematic in others. We now want to understand more about these differences in autistic attention, and whether they are unique to being autistic. We continue to raise awareness of a more positive side of autism, without downplaying the challenges associated with it.

We are dedicated to sharing our findings with a wider audience beyond Academia and to using accessible language that doesn’t oversimplify the science.

Update:

Events:

Save The Date: Teach Meet Workshop, Central London, Tuesday 7 November, 6pm – 8pm. More details to follow.

Funders:
UKRI Economics and Social Research Council
Pears Foundation

CRAE Team:

Jana Brinkert – Postdoctoral Research Associate

Freya Elise – Research Assistant

Charlie Hamilton – Communications Assistant

Brian Irvine – Postdoctoral Research Associate

Anna Remington – Principal Investigator

External Partners:

Emily K. Farran – University of Surrey (Co-Investigator)

Elizabeth Milne – University of Sheffield (Co-Investigator)

Daniel Poole – University of Sheffield (collaborator)

Gaia Scerif – Oxford University (Co-Investigator)

Email: attentionresearch_crae@ucl.ac.uk


Key publications:

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